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3 posts tagged writing

2nd April, 2012

“An artist is a creature driven by demons. He don’t know why they choose him and he’s usually too busy to wonder why. He is completely amoral in that he will rob, borrow, beg, or steal from anybody and everybody to get the work done. The writer’s only responsibility is to his art. He will be completely ruthless if he is a good one. He has a dream. It anguishes him so much he must get rid of it. He has no peace until then. Everything goes by the board: honor, pride, decency, security, happiness, all, to get the book written. If a writer has to rob his mother, he will not hesitate; the “Ode on a Grecian Urn” is worth any number of old ladies.”

— William Faulkner, 1956 Paris Review interview ( Mamas, don’t let your babies grow up to be artists.)

(via AUSTIN KLEON)

20th January, 2012

Two years ago, when I wrote the first of these essays it was about my  “egg timer method” of writing.  You never saw that essay, but here’s the  method:  When you don’t want to write, set an egg timer for one hour  (or half hour) and sit down to write until the timer rings.  If you  still hate writing, you’re free in an hour.  But usually, by the time  that alarm rings, you’ll be so involved in your work, enjoying it so  much, you’ll keep going.  Instead of an egg timer, you can put a load of  clothes in the washer or dryer and use them to time your work.   Alternating the thoughtful task of writing with the mindless work of  laundry or dish washing will give you the breaks you need for new ideas  and insights to occur.  If you don’t know what comes next in the story…   clean your toilet.  Change the bed sheets.  For Christ sakes, dust the  computer.  A better idea will come. 
bbook:

13 Writing Tips From Chuck Palahniuk

Two years ago, when I wrote the first of these essays it was about my “egg timer method” of writing.  You never saw that essay, but here’s the method:  When you don’t want to write, set an egg timer for one hour (or half hour) and sit down to write until the timer rings.  If you still hate writing, you’re free in an hour.  But usually, by the time that alarm rings, you’ll be so involved in your work, enjoying it so much, you’ll keep going.  Instead of an egg timer, you can put a load of clothes in the washer or dryer and use them to time your work.  Alternating the thoughtful task of writing with the mindless work of laundry or dish washing will give you the breaks you need for new ideas and insights to occur.  If you don’t know what comes next in the story…  clean your toilet.  Change the bed sheets.  For Christ sakes, dust the computer.  A better idea will come.

bbook:

13 Writing Tips From Chuck Palahniuk

(via BlackBook)